PRESS COVERAGE
  • While seemingly inconsequential, a temperature difference of a mere 0.5 C can signify a threat to life and disaster for millions around the world, according to climate expert Joy Pereira. Limiting the planet’s warming to 1.5 C instead of 2 C will change the fate of several hundred million people, said the vice-chair of Working Group II on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — an intergovernmental body of the United Nations — at a webinar in Hong Kong on Feb 5. Since the pre-industrial period, the temperature has risen by 1 degree C, putting it on course to reach 1.5 degrees C, she said at the online seminar titled “Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations”. China Daily co-organized the event alongside the University of International Business and Economics, Shanghai International Studies University, and the Asia News Network, an alliance of 23 leading media outlets across 21 Asian countries. ANN Executive Director Pana Janviroj and DJ Clark, multimedia director of China Daily Asia Pacific, moderated the panel discussion. Pereira stressed the need to take joint action in dealing with climate change, something that is urgent and far-reaching. “The lower we can keep the warming, the better it is. And every year matters. The faster we take action, the cheaper is the cost down the road,” she said. “Planet Earth is our only home, and addressing climate change has a direct bearing on the future of humanity,” said Zhou Shuchun, a member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, and publisher and editor-in-chief of China Daily. “The future of global climate governance is drawing greater attention, and no country can avoid the crisis. There must be global action, global response and global cooperation,” he said at the virtual discussion. A key player in the Paris Agreement, China has been proactively implementing balanced and sustainable development that features harmonious coexistence of nature and humanity. Zhou cited President Xi Jinping’s remarks at the Climate Ambition Summit at the end of last year to further elaborate on China’s beliefs and visions on combating global warming. “In meeting the climate challenge, no one can be aloof, and unilateralism will get us nowhere. Only by upholding multilateralism, unity and cooperation can we deliver shared benefits and win-win for all nations,” Xi said. Gao Xiang, a professor at the National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation of China’s Ministry of Ecology and Environment, said China fulfilled its 2020 carbon-cut target ahead of schedule, and China’s progress can boost confidence in the whole of Asia in pursuit of green recovery with low-carbon ways of life and production. Lauding China’s commitments to cut carbon dioxide emissions, he said that efforts have been made in the nation’s energy sector, the biggest source of carbon emissions, by switching to renewable energy as well as the use of technology and other measures to improve energy efficiency. Increasing public awareness is one of the priority tasks apart from developments in science and technology, Gao said, with cities, communities, industrial parks and campuses serving as low-carbon pilot areas in deployment, while the media can help reach the wider public and build a consensus. Zhou pointed out the media’s “indispensable and irreplaceable role” in global climate progress. Noting that ANN members have jointly offered the world “Asia’s voice along with Asia’s views”, he said the efforts have “fostered favorable public opinion in the international community, which further facilitates Asian nations in their joint endeavor to tackle the global challenge”. “China Daily would like to further strengthen communication and cooperation with ANN members and other media, and join hands to make an even greater contribution to tackling global challenges such as climate change,” he said. “If you focus on the doom and gloom (side of climate change), people tend to switch off,” said Jonathan Lynn, head of communications and media relations at the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To raise people’s climate change awareness, it is best to have stories with a positive angle to show people how a solution can be achieved and to share best practices, he said. For example, coverage focusing on tragedies caused by natural disasters may not be something that people want to focus on, while bringing in such discussions on climate change during the coverage may make people see reporters as being heartless. “If you can bring a story where you show how the community has come together and dealt with this crisis, and maybe come to a longer-term solution where they can make their community stronger afterwards, this taps into a sort of deep, almost mythological kind of need in humanity,” said Lynn. Zofeen Ebrahim, Pakistan editor for online platform The Third Pole, said covering climate is complicated as it is an abstract topic. “There is a lot of science involved in it,” she said, adding that the coverage requires learning, researching and deciphering the language of the scientists. In Pakistan, Ebrahim said, a key challenge in reporting climate change is that many journalists consider it a difficult subject that they feel less familiar with and one that requires more time. Krixia Subingsubing, a reporter for the Philippine Daily Inquirer, said most people in the Philippines are aware of the connection between climate change and the extreme weather events the country experiences. Between 2010 and 2019, a total of 12,097 people died from extreme natural events and disasters in the Philippines, according to data from the Philippine Statistics Authority. The damage incurred amounted to 463 billion pesos (US$9.61 billion). But Subingsubing said there are still challenges in getting people more involved in the topic. “Our paradigm right now is that climate change is really a communications battle,” she said, adding that relevant stories not only need to combat “climate change deniers”, but also need to focus on how to draw attention from people who are indifferent to the topic to learn the science behind it. “The road to net-zero is fraught with many challenges,” said Jessica Cheam, founder and managing director of Eco-Business, a media organization focusing on sustainable development. Cheam said the world has made tremendous progress in tackling climate change, with many Asian countries making net-zero pledges. “What’s encouraging to see is that not just countries started to make net-zero pledges, but the corporates are also starting to make these pledges.” Noting, however, that many companies are making such commitments to benefit from the publicity, she stressed the need for the media to scrutinize these pledges and look into the details. In addition, Cheam said, cooperation among governments still needs to be improved in Asia, and multilateralism and trust are required to promote such development. Contact the writers at vivienxu@chinadailyapac.com
    2021-02-22
  • By reporting on the progress of climate change in Asia, members of the media in the region have contributed to the joint efforts made by different countries to tackle the global challenge, a webinar panel heard on Friday. “The media plays an indispensable and irreplaceable role in global climate progress,” said Zhou Shuchun, Standing Committee member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, and editor-in-chief of China Daily. China Daily is a member of Asia News Network, an alliance of 23 news organizations in the region. Noting that ANN members have jointly offered the world “Asia’s voice along with Asia’s views”, Zhou said the efforts have “fostered favorable public opinion in the international community, which further facilitates Asian nations in their joint endeavor to tackle the global challenge”. Zhou was delivering his welcoming remarks at a webinar themed “Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations”. The event was co-organized by China Daily, China’s University of International Business and Economic and Shanghai International Studies University, and ANN. “China Daily would like to further strengthen communication and cooperation with ANN members and other media, and join hands to make an even greater contribution to tackling global challenges such as climate change,” he said. During a panel discussion, members of the media from around Asia and other climate change experts exchanged insights. “If you focus on the doom and gloom (side of climate change), people tend to switch off,” said Jonathan Lynn, head of communications and media relations, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an intergovernmental body of the United Nations. To raise people’s awareness of climate change, it’s best to have stories from a positive angle to show people how a solution can be achieved and share best practices, he said. For example, coverage focusing on the tragedies caused by natural disasters may not be something that people want to focus on, while bringing in such discussions on climate change in the coverage may make people think the reporter is being heartless. “If you can bring a story where you show how the community has come together and dealt with this crisis, and maybe come to a longer-term solution where they can make their community stronger afterwards, this taps into a sort of deep, almost mythological kind of need in humanity,” said Lynn. Zofeen Ebrahim, Pakistan editor for online platform The Third Pole, said covering climate is complicated as it is an abstract topic. “There is a lot of science involved in it,” she said, adding that the coverage requires learning, researching and deciphering the language of the scientists. In Pakistan, Ebrahim said, a key challenge in reporting climate change is that many journalists consider it as science and a difficult subject that they feel less familiar with and that requires more time. “For women especially, they feel they do not have the luxury to go into the field, while most climate stories require you to go to remote places,” she said. “We need to come up with a way to formulate or even to entice Pakistani journalists to do good journalism (on climate change topics),” said Ebrahim. As she sees it, providing good journalism is the cheapest and the most economical way to tell people that the health of the planet is at stake. Krixia Subingsubing, a Philippine Daily Inquirer reporter, said most people in the Philippines are aware of the connection between climate change and the extreme weather events the country experiences. “Because we actually feel it gets worse every day. Our fatalities rise with every new disaster that’s coming to our country,” she said. Between 2010 and 2019, a total of 12,097 people died from natural extreme events and disasters in the Philippines, according to data from the Philippine Statistics Authority. The damage incurred amounted to 463 billion pesos (US$9.63 billion). But Subingsubing said there are still challenges in getting people more involved in the topic. “Our paradigm right now is that climate change is really a communications battle,” she said, adding that relevant stories not only need to combat “climate change deniers”, but also need to focus on how to draw attention from people who are indifferent to the topic to learn the science behind it. “The road to net-zero is fraught with many challenges,” said Jessica Cheam, founder and managing director of Eco-Business, a media organization focusing on sustainable development. Cheam said the world has made tremendous progress in tackling climate change, with many Asian countries making net-zero pledges. “What’s encouraging to see is that not just countries started to make net-zero pledges, but the corporates are also starting to make these pledges.” Noting that many companies are making such commitments to benefit from the publicity, she stressed the need for the media to scrutinize these pledges and look into the details. In addition, Cheam said, cooperation among governments still needs to be improved in Asia, and multilateralism and trust are required to promote such development. The panel was moderated by ANN Executive Director Pana Janviroj and DJ Clark, multimedia director of China Daily Asia Pacific. kelly@chinadailyapac.com
    2021-02-09
  • The temperature difference of 0.5 degrees C appears very small, but is the difference between life and disaster for millions around the world, Joy Jacqueline Pereira, vice-chair of Working Group II of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, issued the warning on Friday at an online seminar titled “Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations”. Since the pre-industrial period, the temperature has risen by 1 degree C, putting it on course to reach 1.5 degrees C, she said. If the goal is accomplished, global carbon emissions will peak before 2030. To achieve a pathway compatible to 1.5 degrees C, warming and carbon dioxide emissions should fall by 45 percent by 2030, reaching net zero emissions around 2050 with deep cuts in methane and other pollution, Pereira said. But she added that despite the scientific road map, political and societal resolve is necessary to accelerate the reduction of carbon emissions. The high-level conference was co-organized by China Daily, the University of International Business and Economics, Shanghai International Studies University, and the Asia News Network, an alliance of 23 of the leading media outlets across 21 Asian countries. Zhou Shuchun, Standing Committee member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, and editor-in-chief of China Daily, said that China will make every effort to fully implement the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, achieve the peak of carbon dioxide emissions before 2030, and realize carbon neutrality before 2060. Zhou cited President Xi Jinping’s remarks at the Climate Ambition Summit at the end of last year to further elaborate on China’s beliefs and visions on combating global warming. “In meeting the climate challenge, no one can be aloof, and unilateralism will get us nowhere. Only by upholding multilateralism, unity and cooperation can we deliver shared benefits and win-win for all nations,” Xi said. China, a firm believer in upholding multilateralism, solidarity and cooperation to fight climate change, has been an active participant in international conservation and climate change conferences, Zhou said. Gao Xiang, a professor and division director of International Policy Research at National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation, concurred on China’s commitments to cut carbon dioxide emissions. He said that efforts have been made in the nation’s energy sector, the biggest source of carbon emissions, by switching to renewable energy and the use of technology and other measures to improve energy efficiency. Research on climate science is another key focus for China in tackling the issue, Gao said. China has been working closely with experts from the United Nations to enhance technology development and deployment to mitigate and adapt to climate change, he said. Gao called for greater support, including financial resources and technology, for developing countries to help them achieve their planned targets for carbon emissions. Failure to accomplish such goals will be borne by the whole world, he said. vivienxu@chinadaily.com.cn
    2021-02-09
  • For Immediate Release PRESS RELEASE China Daily Gathers Media Leaders and Experts to Discuss Role of Media in Addressing Climate Change HONG KONG, Feb 5, 2021 – Co-organized by China Daily, University of International Business and Economics, Shanghai International Studies University and Asia News Network, the “Belt and Road Media Seminar” on “Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations” was held virtually on Friday, Feb 5, 2021. Researchers and journalists joined online. The threats of climate change have no boundaries and require multiple countries and policies to face up to the web of problems it creates. Without proper adaptation and mitigation policies, Asian societies and economies will be increasingly vulnerable to climate risks. Mr. Zhou Shuchun, Standing Committee Member of the CPPCC National Committee, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of China Daily, delivered the welcoming remarks. “Planet Earth is our only home and addressing climate change has a direct bearing on the future of humanity. The future of global climate governance is drawing greater attention and no country can avoid the crisis. There must be global action, global response and global cooperation,” he said. He also highlighted that the efforts of Asia News Network members have fostered favorable public opinion in the international community, which further facilitates Asian nations in their joint endeavor to tackle the global challenge. Dr. Joy Jacqueline Pereira, Vice-Chair, Working Group II, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, shared her insights on the topic “Asian Awareness of Climate Change: More to be Done”. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change. She said that since preindustrial times, human activities have caused approximately 1°C of global warming and at the current rate, 1.5°C of global warming would be reached between 2030 and 2052. However, she stressed that limiting global warming to 1.5°C is not impossible, but political and societal will to accelerate transitions is the key. Dr. Gao Xiang, Professor and Division Director of International Policy Research, National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation, spoke on the topic “China’s Climate Change Priorities and Impacts on the Rest of Asia”. The National Center for Climate Change Strategy Research and International Cooperation is an institution directly under the Ministry of Ecology and Environment. Gao highlighted that carbon peaking and neutrality is one of the eight key areas for 2021 set by the Economic Work Conference of China. He stressed that China is actively participating in global climate governance, is a staunch supporter of multilateralism and is willing to help other developing countries enhance their capacity to cope with climate change. Insight Spotlight was followed by a panel discussion moderated by Mr. Pana Janviroj, Executive Director, Asia News Network; and Dr. DJ Clark, Multimedia Director, China Daily Asia Pacific. Researchers and journalists participated in the panel discussion. They are: Ms. Zofeen Ebrahim, Pakistan Editor, The Third Pole; Ms. Krixia Subingsubing, Reporter, Philippine Daily Inquirer;Mr. Jonathan Lynn, Head of Communications and Media Relations, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Ms. Jessica Cheam, Founder and Managing Director, Eco-Business; and Mr. Hou Liqiang, Reporter, China Daily. Together with Dr. Joy Jacqueline Pereira, Vice-Chair, Working Group II, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; and Dr. Gao Xiang, Professor and Division Director of International Policy Research, National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation, speakers examined how the media can better play a leading role in communicating the threats of climate change to the stakeholders. Joy Jacqueline Pereira said, “with respect to solutions for rising sea level, what we have seen in the Southeast Asian region is that Singapore has taken a lot of action in terms of adapting to sea level rise…they have very limited land so they have to take a very strong infrastructure type of protection. In contrast, Indonesia has a great mix of both the natural land-based solutions and also infrastructure. So there are good examples that come from the region that can be emulated. Of course, we can also learn from East Asia, the way that China is handling it as a way forward.” Gao Xiang said we should enhance international cooperation, including through multilateral governance frameworks, to address the issue and provide support to developing countries. “I think for those developing countries, we can enhance the cooperation on climate change. Especially with the concept of green recovery, we need to enhance this kind of mechanism and cooperation to implement this concept into practice,” he said. Zofeen Ebrahim said one of the biggest challenges that Pakistan is facing is that it is completely unprepared. “We don’t even have a plan for how to decarbonize ourselves when the world around us is continuously and rapidly doing that,” she added. Krixia Subingsubing said most of the people in the Philippines accept and are aware of the connection between climate change and the extreme weather events that we experience, because they actually feel it get worse every day. “Our fatalities rise with every new disaster that is coming to our country. Typhoon is a very intricate part of Filipinos’ lives, but the problem is how to get them involved in the topic, even if it is not a typhoon season or even if the climate crisis is not a seasonal topic. Our paradigm right now is that climate change is really a communications battle, not just to combat climate change deniers, but also about how to get people who are indifferent to the topic to be interested in the science behind climate change,” she said. Jonathan Lynn said it’s best to have some kind of positive story related to climate change in the sense that you show how people are coming to a solution. “I think it’s very important to look for those positive examples, which can then be referred back to. This actually then addresses another problem in writing about climate change, which is that it is a very complicated and abstract subject…to come to grips with that can be quite hard for non-specialists. I think linking the story to people and showing a positive solution or outcome are very important,” he said. Jessica Cheam said that the role of government is crucial in coping with climate change. “The world has made tremendous progress in tackling climate change. The US’ rejoining the Paris Agreement is very timely. The Singapore government has made a net-zero pledge, though with no time frame yet. We have seen that Japan, South Korea, and China are making these very important pledges. I think that the road to net-zero is fraught with many challenges. Multilateralism and trust are needed to deal with the challenges,” she said. Hou Liqiang said a marked trend he has noticed in China’s climate progress is that the Chinese government is attaching greater and greater importance to turn to international cooperation for wisdom to tackle climate change. About China Daily Founded in 1981, China Daily covers over 35 million readers and users worldwide through diversified platforms, including newspapers, websites, and mobiles and social media. The number of China Daily’s followers has now reached over 59 million on Weibo, 11 million on the WeChat Blog platform, over 100 million on Facebook and another 4.35 million on Twitter. About China Daily Asia Leadership Roundtable The China Daily Asia Leadership Roundtable is a by-invitation network of movers and shakers in Asia, providing platforms for focused dialogue, issue investigation and possible collective action on strategic issues relating to Asia’s economic, business and social development. Our aim is to enhance communication and increase mutual understanding between China, Asian and Western countries. Roundtable events are held in major cities across Asia.
    2021-02-08
  • Addressing climate change-the biggest challenge facing humanity-demands global action and cooperation from everyone, as "every choice matters to our common home", said scholars and media representatives during a webinar in Hong Kong on Friday. "Planet Earth is our only home, and addressing climate change has a direct bearing on the future of humanity," said Zhou Shuchun, a member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference National Committee, publisher and editor-in-chief of China Daily. "The future of global climate governance is drawing greater attention, and no country can avoid the crisis. There must be global action, global response and global cooperation," Zhou said while addressing virtual discussions with the theme "Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations". Zhou said that as a key player in the Paris Agreement, China has been proactively implementing balanced and sustainable development that features harmonious coexistence of nature and humanity. China aims to achieve a peak in carbon dioxide emissions by 2030, and realize carbon neutrality by 2060. Joy Jacqueline Pereira, vice-chair of Working Group II of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said the majority of emissions come from the energy and agriculture sectors, in addition to industry, transportation and construction. "Since preindustrial times, we have contributed to 1 C of global temperature rise, and we are already seeing the consequences. At the current rate, it will reach 1.5 C in the very near future," Pereira said in a keynote speech. She called for joint action to change that, as even a small rise in temperature has huge consequences. "The lower we can keep the warming, the better it is. And every year matters. The faster we take action, the cheaper the cost is down the road," she said. Gao Xiang, a professor at the National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation at the Ministry of Ecology and Environment, said China fulfilled its 2020 carbon reduction target ahead of schedule, and China's progress can boost confidence in the whole of Asia in pursuit of green recovery with low-carbon lifestyles and production. Due to different development stages of respective economies, some Asian countries still need to work out a specific post-pandemic action road map to minimize carbon emissions in line with the Paris Agreement and UN ecological agendas while tapping potential for sustainable growth, the panelists said.
    2021-02-06
  • Climate change demands global action and cooperation from everyone to address this issue, the biggest global challenge facing mankind, as every year and every choice matters to our common home, according to researchers and journalists who spoke at a webinar in Hong Kong on Friday. “Planet Earth is our only home, and addressing climate change has a direct bearing on the future of humanity,” said Zhou Shuchun, a member of the Standing Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, and the editor-in-chief of China Daily. “The future of global climate governance is drawing greater attention, and no country can avoid the crisis. There must be global action, global response and global cooperation,” Zhou said while addressing virtual discussions with the theme “Climate Changes: Challenges for Asian Nations”. Joy Jacqueline Pereira, vice-chair of Working Group II of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said the majority of emissions comes from the energy and agriculture sectors, plus industry, transportation and construction. “Since pre-industrial times, we have contributed to 1 degree of global warming, and they’re already seeing the consequences. At the current rate, we will reach 1.5 degrees in the very near term,” she said in a keynote speech. She called for joint action to change that, as even a small rise in temperature has huge consequences. “The lower we can keep the warming, the better it is. And every year matters. The faster we take action, the cheaper is the cost down the road,” she said. Gao Xiang, a professor at the National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation of China’s Ministry of Ecology and Environment, said China fulfilled the 2020 carbon-cut target ahead of schedule, and China’s progress can boost confidence in the whole of Asia in pursuit of green recovery with low-carbon ways of life and production. Public awareness is one of the priority tasks apart from science and technology development, with cities, communities, industrial parks and campuses as low-carbon pilot areas in deployment, and the media can help reach the wider public and build a consensus, Gao said. Zhou also pointed out the media’s “indispensable and irreplaceable role” in the global climate progress. “Our efforts have fostered favorable public opinion in the international community, which further facilitates Asian nations in their joint endeavor to tackle the global challenge.” China Daily was one of the event’s organizers, together with the University of International Business and Economics, Shanghai International Studies University, and the Asia News Network, an alliance of 23 of the leading media outlets across 19 Asian countries. Joining the panel discussions were Jonathan Lynn, head of communications and media relations, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Jessica Cheam, founder and managing director of Eco-Business; Zofeen Ebrahim, Pakistan editor of The Third Pole; Krixia Subingsubing from the Philippine Daily Inquirer; and China Daily reporter Hou Liqiang. Pana Janviroj, executive director of the Asia News Network, joined Dr DJ Clark, multimedia director of China Daily Asia Pacific, as moderators. Due to different development stages of respective economies, some Asian countries still need to work out a specific post-pandemic action road map to minimize carbon emissions in line with the Paris Agreement and UN ecological agendas while tapping potentials for sustainable growth, the panelists said. Contact the writers at vivienxu@chinadailyapac.com
    2021-02-06
SPEAKERS
VIDEO
Sponsors & Partners